Review: Rocketbook Everlast Notebook

It’s no secret that I love notebooks. So when I put together my Christmas wish list this year, it included the Rocketbook reusable smart notebook. And I got one.

So, how does it work?

The Rocketbook Everlast is a reusable notebook that can be set up to automatically upload pages to favorite online services. Unlike the Rocketbook Wave, you don’t microwave the notebook to erase it. You simply use a damp cloth or even a paper towel and wipe it off. While the Wave claims you can erase the pages five times, the Everlast doesn’t have that limit. You can supposedly erase it as many times as you’d like.

One caveat is that you need to use a Pilot Frixion pen. The good news is that these pens are inexpensive, easy to find, and come in various sizes and styles. Pens are a very personal choice (indeed, like notebooks), so some people might not be happy about being forced to use a specific brand, but I find the Frixion reasonably comfortable and smooth enough on the Everlast’s glossy pages.

There are 18 sheets, 36 pages, in my notebook. The notebook comes with a black pen, but you can use any Frixion pen, with whatever color and thickness you like. It also comes with a cloth, but you can use any cloth you’d like.

When you’ve completed your notes, use the Rocketbook app to take a picture of the page and upload it to your favorite online service. At the bottom of each page there are seven faint icons. If you mark one, the app automatically uploads the page to the location you configure for that icon, which can be common cloud services or email. For example, I configured the first icon to upload to a specific directory on Google Docs. When I used the app to scan the page, it worked flawlessly, quickly dropping either a PDF or PNG (your choice) to my folder.

With good OCR software and better note-taking penmanship than mine, you could theoretically turn your notes into text files that you can copy into Word or whatever editor you like.

The notebook is network agnostic. The connection is handled by the mobile app, so whatever your phone or tablet is connected to is your notebook’s connection.

Another thing I like is that the pages use a dot grid rather than lines. Lines can be restrictive and I often ignore them. For people whose notes include sketches and doodles, a dot grid is great. Or for people like me who like to avoid rules and borders when brainstorming. Revision is for coloring inside the lines. Drafting has very few lines, and the lines are very personal, defined by needs that can change constantly.

Of course, a plain old notebook is pretty near perfect, and this is a new thing that can be improved with time, but it’s great if you’d like to store notes digitally rather than in a pile of notebooks on a shelf or closet.

So, I’m not about to throw out my unused notebooks and use this exclusively, but it gives me another option that works great for some tasks.

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